cwhaticando.com home DIY • Do it Yourself • Weekend Projects • BIG Projects • LITTLE Projects
become a creator share your how-to about cWhatIcanDo  

 

 

close window

How Do I Share My How-To?

It's really pretty easy, pictures and videos of the steps it takes to complete your project are stored on YouTube and picasaWeb. Once your "final" video is stored on YouTube, your project will show in the listings on the site. All this is controlled by our Creator's Tools. Basically, you start a project by writing up the project idea.

Step 1. Sign up for a free Creator's Account to gain access to the Creator's Tools.

Step 2. Login

Step 3. Push the "Create New Project" button on the Creator's Tools. Make a name (you can change it later) for your project. And describe your plans to use as notes to guide the creation of the steps.

Step 4. When you've finished providing all the steps to your project, shooting the videos and saving to google video via the Creator's Tool Panel, you are ready to write the introductory paragraph with an interesting story of how you did it, or how you do it in the case of a professional services presentation.

Step 5. Last but not least create and upload the video (to YouTube) which is the video that will be used to summarize the project. If you were building a robot, this final video would show the robot running around, doing fun things that will inspire others to create their version of your project.

That's it... Watch the views and ratings for your project pile up along with the sales commissions! Or get a customer because you showed how you remodel a house.

close window

FAQ About Becoming A Creator

Q. Why would I go to all that work, building something, then put it on a website like C What I Can Do? What's the point?

A. Actually, there are a couple of forms for a reward:

  1. You get rated as an author. Lots of good ratings looks good on your resume.
  2. You Make Money!

YOU Make Money when someone buys a part from You, and builds it into Their Version of your project. And, if YOU have a basement full of red leds and build a red led project - we'll send you customers who are inspired to build your blinking light device. If you sell PC boards, you may link to your own sales. Or sell your own kit online through your e-Bay store.

The same with books! We encourage project builders to make books. In fact, CwhatIcanDo is a great place to get rated as an author. 'Betcha get a better deal from your publisher...

Of course, it is possible that your project won't make you any money, because someone built something even cooler than yours (maybe even inspired by your project.) Maybe you just want to show your version of another project... It's done in the spirit of the web: Sharing ideas. And it's fun building a project on your own.


+ Creator's Login:
User Name:
Password:
 
+ Sign Up For Free and Become a Creator:
First Name:
Last Name:
User Name:
Email :
Password:
 

Roboteer`s Guide to BeagleBone Black      ...     13192 Views
Author's name: weRbots       

I feel like I`ve combed the earth for the "just right" combinations of features, ease of use, intrinsic power to do exciting things.

It felt like the world was stuck with Arduinos and PICs, slowly crawling along the speed and power lines of typical controllers. An 80mHz chip is Awesome in it`s power and capabilities for robot control, but always coming up short when I want to build "My Ultimate Robot." (For home use, of course.)

So the Beagle Bone, specifically the Black, or BBB as them that use it tend to call it is priced just a smidgen higher than an Arduino Uno, but holy smokes, I think I`m glad I waited a while.

Arguably, not long enough though, dealing with one of these things is no walk in the park. Either things will go smooth as butter on bread, or, you have my experience!

In other words, I`m saying BBB is not for everyone, certainly not for the faint of heart, that`s for sure.

So I figured I`d chronicle my dealing with the BBB, from fumbling not to touch anything metal when you remove it from the anti-static bag, to actually making some things that we, as robo-hackers and modders can "graduate" to.

Basic Hookup     
You can only "hookup" one more thing, a serial port to what is called a debugging port. That`s the only thing missing here.

This BBB is hooked up to an HDMI monitor and old 720p TV set. It works just fine.

But, not just "out of the box." In fact, some things worked out of the box, then stopped abruptly.

I hooked mine up first through a connection to a PC which allowed me to hook it up to Ethernet and ping websites and all that sort.

Then I hooked it up to HDMI with no Ethernet and it tended to work.

What did work first was cloud9... That was very nice, I could play around right on my own webserver page (even only command line processing on the BBB).

After I moved it again to run from a PC, everything that had originally run "out of the box", was finished. Kaput!

I couldn`t even connect. I was only a little discouraged, because via the command line and through a browser connected to the URL, I could bang around with the BBB like a champ.

Oh, and the SSH didn`t work at all, although I did get an enticing login when I ran Gate One SSH client, again right from the browser... Pretty cool.

But what kept me searching the internet and moving forward. I`m not a total noob to linux, but I`ve never been great at it. I mostly rely on others to keep the packages organized, I`m gonna run someone`s linux who`s done all the work. I install as workstation or server.

Well, now I`m starting to like this little black $45 Linux device. I`m digging in the documentation and reading the forums, so I`m beginning to like what I see. This might just be what I`m looking for, the ultimate robot controller seemingly endless in it`s robotic potential.
How I got Help to Get Going     
I don`t know who was the biggest help, but they helped me, in the following order:

After digging around, finding this out piece-by-piece, I stumbled on this jewel, and I treasure it...

Some quick-start things to do for developing on the BBB Posted by shabaz on May 22, 2013 6:18:58 AM

http://www.element14.com/community/community/knode/single-board_computers/next-gen_beaglebone/blog/2013/05/22/some-quick-start-things-to-do-for-developing-on-the-bbb

While I was prepared to work out a complex map of functions, pins, etc. I discovered this: Autonomous Rugged Maze Navigating Robot by Andy Darter and Luke Kaufman, final project for a Senior Design Course at Wyoming, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department.

https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=ZGVmYXVsdGRvbWFpbnxiZWFnbGVib25lcm9ib3R8Z3g6Y2Q3NzdhZTlkZDc4ODFl

That should do it. Should you run into issues on your unit:

Skip down to (5) to see the solution to ssh_exchange_identification: Connection closed by remote host. http://osdir.com/ml/beagleboard/2013-05/msg00350.html

Cloud9 issues - https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!topic/beagleboard/L-Oo-tEr92c

And We Are Off!     
First of all I needed to decide what I wanted in my "total robot."

Here is where some research on i-Robot robotic sweeper has many things I want/need.

I test my bots on a deck. So here is Minimum:

Must Have edge detection exotic is better.
Sonar Detectors so SPI bus, Definitely I2C, I want ADCs checking battery power, I want a tricolor LED to reflect system condition from a distance.

I want to PWM at least two drive motors. I want to be able to drive minimum two, perhaps four servos and maybe more for arms/legs/etc...

I want LEDs for running lights...

I want outdoor level Pong((( ultrasounds. I want to be able to accommodate four different IR sensors for close-up recognition.

I want an electromagnetic pickup to guide the robot along a wire loop exciting the loop with HF or LF detecting it by riding along with the most sensor strength, while still avoiding obstacles.

I want RF remote control for "calling" the robot to "find" me.

Voila! Our Roboteer`s Guide to BeagleBone Black P8     
I churned through the drawings on the beaglebone`s own website to put together a proposed "Robot Builder`s Pin Guide to Beagle Bone Black (Cape compatible pin guide.)

How could we expect anyone to understand the situation of the poor lonely robot builder with a mostly improvised R&D budget?

We couldn`t, so here`s our First Pass...

Regarding every output a robot-builder would/could want. Yes, someday we`ll just buy a robot "chip" but for now, we can probably buy a robot like beagle-bone with a standardized Cape Layout.

The FINAL place I arrived, showed how to use bonescript to do analog stuff (input and output) and other things. https://github.com/jadonk/bonescript is the place to get yourself "crackin."

One more note on this proposed P8 and P9, when you start experimenting ie: blinky lights, you won`t have built a thing to change the mode for most pins, so Use the FIRST listing as a guideline, the first listing is what we are going to get when we initialize, since your first project will be simple like blinkies, and you will use the standard boot up. That means the P8 and P9 pins are marked fairly clearly, you have to pay attention, or the editor, I used Cloud9.


Roboteer`s Guide to BeagleBone Black P9     
I don`t yet know how to put the pins in the various modes that produce such a map, but that will come soon as this project moves on from here.

From the users manual from beagle bone (black) I found several tables as I`ve shown here. I am a bit jarred to not have the SPI bus.

I struggled for a moment, till I finally had to actually read all the words. I find the following:

"There are
some signals that have not been listed here. Refer to the processor
documentation for more information on these pins and detailed descriptions of all of the
pins listed. In some cases there may not be enough signals to complete a group of signals
that may
be required to implement a total interface."



OK, then...
The layout as shown here is the One we are going with. BTW: I`ve never used the SPI. I just want it to be available.


Summary of potential for Robotic Applications     
As-Is Out of the box, here`s what a robot guy gets. No software has run as yet:

P9 Connections Default
Analog In: 6
Digital In Out: 18
i2c: 1
SPI: 1-

P8 Connections Default
Digital In Out: 14

I`ve not used the SPI in a robot, so I can live without it. But right now, out of the box, you can drive a lot of blinky lights with a total of 32 gpio`s at your service, I am sure we`ll start finding these things running LED arrays as displays.

There is, out of the box, a single i2c bus, and that will be fine. I love using i2c with microprocessors ever since using a fancy schmancy Ultrasound setup. Boy did that work well...

More analog in`s than you can shake a stick at, that`s very cool.

Note what is missing relative to the infamous Arduino, and even the little picAxe? PWMout or Analog Out on the Arduino. Missing!




Software Makes it Go     
I used cloud9, but you can also write code using telnet on another machine.

The code is very simple, but it`s a beginning!!!


//////////////////////////////////////////////////
// fire up bonescript
var b = require(`bonescript`);

// I started with best intentions from fade.js from BBB docus
// Then I added pins
var awPin = "P8_13"; // original pin
var bwPin = "P8_19"; // original pin
var led1 = "P9_14"; // added all these LEDs jumping around a bit
var led2 = "P9_16";
var led3 = "P9_23";
var led4 = "P9_24";
var led5 = "P9_26";
var led6 = "P9_30";
var ledL = "P9_11";
var ledR = "P8_26";

// configure pin
b.pinMode(awPin, b.OUTPUT);
b.pinMode(bwPin, b.OUTPUT);
b.pinMode(led1, b.OUTPUT);
b.pinMode(led2, b.OUTPUT);
b.pinMode(led3, b.OUTPUT);
b.pinMode(led4, b.OUTPUT);
b.pinMode(led5, b.OUTPUT);
b.pinMode(led6, b.OUTPUT);
b.pinMode(ledL, b.OUTPUT);
b.pinMode(ledR, b.OUTPUT);



// setup starting conditions
var awValue = 0.01;
var awDirection = 1;
b.digitalWrite(ledL, b.LOW);
b.digitalWrite(ledR, b.LOW);
b.digitalWrite(led3, b.LOW);
b.digitalWrite(led4, b.LOW);
b.digitalWrite(led5, b.LOW);
b.digitalWrite(led6, b.LOW);


// call function to update brightness every 10ms
setInterval(fade, 10);
//setInterval(blink,10);

// function to update brightness
function fade() {
b.analogWrite(awPin, awValue);
b.analogWrite(bwPin, awValue);
b.analogWrite(led1, awValue);
b.analogWrite(led2, awValue);

awValue = awValue + (awDirection*0.01);
if(awValue > 1.0) { awValue = 1.0; awDirection = -1; unblink();}
else if(awValue <= 0.01) { awValue = 0.01; awDirection = 1; blink();}
}

// this function sets the pins high and turns them off
function unblink(){
b.digitalWrite(ledL, b.HIGH);
b.digitalWrite(ledR, b.HIGH);
b.digitalWrite(led3, b.HIGH);
b.digitalWrite(led4, b.HIGH);
b.digitalWrite(led5, b.HIGH);
b.digitalWrite(led6, b.HIGH);
}

// when the pin goes low, the LED lights up
function blink(){
b.digitalWrite(ledL, b.LOW);
b.digitalWrite(ledR, b.LOW);
b.digitalWrite(led3, b.LOW);
b.digitalWrite(led4, b.LOW);
b.digitalWrite(led5, b.LOW);
b.digitalWrite(led6, b.LOW);
}
What`s Next     
Now I have to develop, mostly find other`s work and put it together into a simple "plug in" piece of software (I think, in Bone javascript.) But, I may have to write some C++ (scary, but I can hack my way through someone`s code - assuming I am able to find supporting code.

Now that I`m digging around, I`m finding C libraries for the beaglebone.

Oh yes, here`s a tip you`ll likely need or at least want. How to find out the IP number of your BBB. Open a terminal window.
At the prompt enter lsconfig, if you remembered to plug into a network, you will be assigned an IP number. Write it down, cuz when you hookup to your beagleboard from your own network, you`ll need the IP number.

So this first brush with the BBB has been kinda fun. I`ve learned a bit more about linux. I think I`m going to like applying this thing to robots I builld, for the extra expense, the features sure seem worth it.

Software development is easy, but I fear in the end I`ll be using other devices for things that have to run smoothly. But. I can also add cameras and software for image recognition. I just can`t wait to get going with the next project using beagle bone black, I may even get another one...


Yes, I will keep you posted...
Pinouts From Power Up     
Here`s a list manufactured by my own little javascript routine, allowing the BBB to create a list of Pinouts with the details of how they are setup.


pin = P8_3, name = GPIO1_6
mux = 1, pullup = pullup, slew = fast
options = gpmc_ad6,mmc1_dat6,NA,NA,NA,NA,NA,gpio1_6

pin = P8_4, name = GPIO1_7
mux = 1, pullup = pullup, slew = fast
options = gpmc_ad7,mmc1_dat7,NA,NA,NA,NA,NA,gpio1_7

pin = P8_5, name = GPIO1_2
mux = 1, pullup = pullup, slew = fast
options = gpmc_ad2,mmc1_dat2,NA,NA,NA,NA,NA,gpio1_2

pin = P8_6, name = GPIO1_3
mux = 1, pullup = pullup, slew = fast
options = gpmc_ad3,mmc1_dat3,NA,NA,NA,NA,NA,gpio1_3

pin = P8_7, name = TIMER4
mux = 7, pullup = pullup, slew = fast
options = gpmc_advn_ale,NA,NA,NA,NA,NA,NA,mmc1_sdcd

pin = P8_8, name = TIMER7
mux = 7, pullup = pullup, slew = fast
options = gpmc_oen_ren,NA,NA,NA,NA,NA,NA,gpio2_3

pin = P8_9, name = TIMER5
mux = 7, pullup = pullup, slew = fast
options = gpmc_ben0_cle,NA,NA,NA,NA,NA,NA,gpio2_5

pin = P8_10, name = TIMER6
mux = 7, pullup = pullup, slew = fast
options = gpmc_wen,NA,NA,NA,NA,NA,NA,gpio2_4

pin = P8_11, name = GPIO1_13
mux = 7, pullup = pulldown, slew = fast
options = gpmc_ad13,lcd_data18,mmc1_dat5,mmc2_dat1,eqep2B_in,pr1_mii0_txd,pr1_pru0_pru_r30_15,gpio1_13

pin = P8_12, name = GPIO1_12
mux = 7, pullup = pulldown, slew = fast
options = gpmc_ad12,lcd_data19,mmc1_dat4,mmc2_dat0,eqep2a_in,pr1_mii0_txd2,pr1_pru0_pru_r30_14,gpio1_12

pin = P8_13, name = EHRPWM2B
mux = 7, pullup = pulldown, slew = fast
options = gpmc_ad9,lcd_data22,mmc1_dat1,mmc2_dat5,ehrpwm2B,pr1_mii0_col,NA,gpio0_23

pin = P8_14, name = GPIO0_26
mux = 7, pullup = pulldown, slew = fast
options = gpmc_ad10,lcd_data21,mmc1_dat2,mmc2_dat6,ehrpwm2_tripzone_input,pr1_mii0_txen,NA,gpio0_26

pin = P8_15, name = GPIO1_15
mux = 7, pullup = pulldown, slew = fast
options = gpmc_ad15,lcd_data16,mmc1_dat7,mmc2_dat3,eqep2_strobe,pr1_ecap0_ecap_capin_apwm_o,pr1_pru0_pru_r31_15,gpio1_15

pin = P8_16, name = GPIO1_14
mux = 7, pullup = pulldown, slew = fast
options = gpmc_ad14,lcd_data17,mmc1_dat6,mmc2_dat2,eqep2_index,pr1_mii0_txd0,pr1_pru0_pru_r31_14,gpio1_14

pin = P8_17, name = GPIO0_27
mux = 7, pullup = pulldown, slew = fast
options = gpmc_ad11,lcd_data20,mmc1_dat3,mmc2_dat7,ehrpwm0_synco,pr1_mii0_txd3,NA,gpio0_27

pin = P8_18, name = GPIO2_1
mux = 7, pullup = pulldown, slew = fast
options = gpmc_clk,lcd_memory_clk_mux,NA,mmc2_clk,NA,NA,mcasp0_fsr,gpio2_1

pin = P8_19, name = EHRPWM2A
mux = 7, pullup = pulldown, slew = fast
options = gpmc_ad8,lcd_data23,mmc1_dat0,mmc2_dat4,ehrpwm2A,pr1_mii_mt0_clk,NA,gpio0_22

pin = P8_20, name = GPIO1_31
mux = 2, pullup = pullup, slew = fast
options = gpmc_csn2,gpmc_be1n,mmc1_cmd,pr1_edio_data_in7,pr1_edio_data_out7,pr1_pru1_pru_r30_13,pr1_pru1_pru_r31_13,gpio1_31

pin = P8_21, name = GPIO1_30
mux = 2, pullup = pullup, slew = fast
options = gpmc_csn1,gpmc_clk,mmc1_clk,pr1_edio_data_in6,pr1_edio_data_out6,pr1_pru1_pru_r30_12,pr1_pru1_pru_r31_12,gpio1_30

pin = P8_22, name = GPIO1_5
mux = 1, pullup = pullup, slew = fast
options = gpmc_ad5,mmc1_dat5,NA,NA,NA,NA,NA,gpio1_5

pin = P8_23, name = GPIO1_4
mux = 1, pullup = pullup, slew = fast
options = gpmc_ad4,mmc1_dat4,NA,NA,NA,NA,NA,gpio1_4

pin = P8_24, name = GPIO1_1
mux = 1, pullup = pullup, slew = fast
options = gpmc_ad1,mmc1_dat1,NA,NA,NA,NA,NA,gpio1_1

pin = P8_25, name = GPIO1_0
mux = 1, pullup = pullup, slew = fast
options = gpmc_ad0,mmc1_dat0,NA,NA,NA,NA,NA,gpio1_0

pin = P8_26, name = GPIO1_29
mux = 7, pullup = pullup, slew = fast
options = gpmc_csn0,NA,NA,NA,NA,NA,NA,gpio1_29

pin = P8_27, name = GPIO2_22
mux = 0, pullup = pulldown, slew = fast
options = lcd_vsync,gpmc_a8,NA,pr1_edio_data_in2,pr1_edio_data_out2,pr1_pru1_pru_r30_8,pr1_pru1_pru_r31_8,gpio2_22

pin = P8_28, name = GPIO2_24
mux = 0, pullup = pulldown, slew = fast
options = lcd_pclk,gpmc_a10,pr1_mii0_crs,pr1_edio_data_in4,pr1_edio_data_out4,pr1_pru1_pru_r30_10,pr1_pru1_pru_r31_10,gpio2_24

pin = P8_29, name = GPIO2_23
mux = 0, pullup = pulldown, slew = fast
options = lcd_hsync,gpmc_a9,NA,pr1_edio_data_in3,pr1_edio_data_out3,pr1_pru1_pru_r30_9,pr1_pru1_pru_r31_9,gpio2_23

pin = P8_30, name = GPIO2_25
mux = 0, pullup = pulldown, slew = fast
options = lcd_ac_bias_en,gpmc_a11,pr1_mii1_crs,pr1_edio_data_in5,pr1_edio_data_out5,pr1_pru1_pru_r30_11,pr1_pru1_pru_r31_11,gpio2_25

pin = P8_31, name = UART5_CTSN
mux = 0, pullup = disabled, slew = fast
options = lcd_data14,gpmc_a18,NA,mcasp0_axr1,NA,NA,NA,gpio0_10

pin = P8_32, name = UART5_RTSN
mux = 0, pullup = disabled, slew = fast
options = lcd_data15,gpmc_a19,NA,mcasp0_ahclkx,mcasp0_axr3,NA,NA,gpio0_11

pin = P8_33, name = UART4_RTSN
mux = 0, pullup = disabled, slew = fast
options = lcd_data13,gpmc_a17,NA,mcasp0_fsr,mcasp0_axr3,NA,NA,gpio0_9

pin = P8_34, name = UART3_RTSN
mux = 0, pullup = disabled, slew = fast
options = lcd_data11,gpmc_a15,NA,mcasp0_ahclkr,mcasp0_axr2,NA,NA,gpio2_17

pin = P8_35, name = UART4_CTSN
mux = 0, pullup = disabled, slew = fast
options = lcd_data12,gpmc_a16,NA,mcasp0_aclkr,mcasp0_axr2,NA,NA,gpio0_8

pin = P8_36, name = UART3_CTSN
mux = 0, pullup = disabled, slew = fast
options = lcd_data10,gpmc_a14,ehrpwm1A,mcasp0_axr0,mcasp0_axr0,pr1_mii0_rxd1,uart3_ctsn,gpio2_16

pin = P8_37, name = UART5_TXD
mux = 0, pullup = disabled, slew = fast
options = lcd_data8,gpmc_a12,NA,mcasp0_aclkx,NA,NA,uart2_ctsn,gpio2_14

pin = P8_38, name = UART5_RXD
mux = 0, pullup = disabled, slew = fast
options = lcd_data9,gpmc_a13,NA,mcasp0_fsx,NA,NA,uart2_rtsn,gpio2_15

pin = P8_39, name = GPIO2_12
mux = 0, pullup = disabled, slew = fast
options = lcd_data6,gpmc_a6,pr1_edio_data_in6,eqep2_index,pr1_edio_data_out6,pr1_pru1_pru_r30_6,pr1_pru1_pru_r31_6,gpio2_12

pin = P8_40, name = GPIO2_13
mux = 0, pullup = disabled, slew = fast
options = lcd_data7,gpmc_a7,pr1_edio_data_in7,eqep2_strobe,pr1_pru1_pru_r30_7,pr1_pru_pru1_r30_7,pr1_pru1_pru_r31_7,gpio2_13

pin = P8_41, name = GPIO2_10
mux = 0, pullup = disabled, slew = fast
options = lcd_data4,gpmc_a4,pr1_mii0_txd1,eQEP2A_in,NA,pr1_pru1_pru_r30_4,pr1_pru1_pru_r31_4,gpio2_10

pin = P8_42, name = GPIO2_11
mux = 0, pullup = disabled, slew = fast
options = lcd_data5,gpmc_a5,pr1_mii0_txd0,eqep2b_in,NA,pr1_pru1_pru_r30_5,pr1_pru1_pru_r31_5,gpio2_11

pin = P8_43, name = GPIO2_8
mux = 0, pullup = disabled, slew = fast
options = lcd_data2,gpmc_a2,pr1_mii0_txd3,ehrpwm2_tripzone_input,NA,pr1_pru1_pru_r30_2,pr1_pru1_pru_r31_2,gpio2_8

pin = P8_44, name = GPIO2_9
mux = 0, pullup = disabled, slew = fast
options = lcd_data3,gpmc_a3,pr1_mii0_txd2,ehrpwm0_synco,NA,pr1_pru1_pru_r30_3,pr1_pru1_pru_r31_3,gpio2_9

pin = P8_45, name = GPIO2_6
mux = 0, pullup = disabled, slew = fast
options = lcd_data0,gpmc_a0,pr1_mii_mt0_clk,ehrpwm2A,NA,pr1_pru1_pru_r30_0,pr1_pru1_pru_r31_0,gpio2_6

pin = P8_46, name = GPIO2_7
mux = 0, pullup = disabled, slew = fast
options = lcd_data1,gpmc_a1,pr1_mii0_txen,ehrpwm2B,NA,pr1_pru1_pru_r30_1,pr1_pru1_pru_r31_1,gpio2_7

-----------end P* --------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------


pin = P9_11, name = UART4_RXD
mux = 7, pullup = pullup, slew = fast
options = gpmc_wait0,mii2_crs,NA,rmii2_crs_dv,mmc1_sdcd,NA,NA,gpio0_30

pin = P9_12, name = GPIO1_28
mux = 7, pullup = pullup, slew = fast
options = gpmc_ben1,mii2_col,NA,mmc2_dat3,NA,NA,mcasp0_aclkr,gpio1_28

pin = P9_13, name = UART4_TXD
mux = 7, pullup = pullup, slew = fast
options = gpmc_wpn,mii2_rxerr,NA,rmii2_rxerr,mmc2_sdcd,NA,NA,gpio0_31

pin = P9_14, name = EHRPWM1A
mux = 7, pullup = pulldown, slew = fast
options = gpmc_a2,gmii2_txd3,rgmii2_td3,mmc2_dat1,gpmc_a18,pr1_mii1_txd2,ehrpwm1A,gpio1_18

pin = P9_15, name = GPIO1_16
mux = 0, pullup = pulldown, slew = fast
options = mii1_rxd3,NA,rgmii1_rd3,mmc0_dat5,mmc1_dat2,NA,mcasp0_axr0,gpio2_18

pin = P9_16, name = EHRPWM1B
mux = 7, pullup = pulldown, slew = fast
options = gpmc_a3,gmii2_txd2,rgmii2_td2,mmc2_dat2,gpmc_a19,pr1_mii1_txd1,ehrpwm1B,gpio1_19

pin = P9_17, name = I2C1_SCL
mux = 2, pullup = pulldown, slew = slow
options = spi0_cs0,mmc2_sdwp,i2c1_scl,NA,NA,NA,NA,gpio0_5

pin = P9_18, name = I2C1_SDA
mux = 2, pullup = pulldown, slew = slow
options = spi0_d1,mmc1_sdwp,i2c1_sda,NA,NA,NA,NA,gpio0_4

pin = P9_19, name = I2C2_SCL
mux = 3, pullup = pullup, slew = slow
options = uart1_rtsn,NA,d_can0_rx,i2c2_scl,spi1_cs1,NA,NA,gpio0_13

pin = P9_20, name = I2C2_SDA
mux = 3, pullup = pullup, slew = slow
options = uart1_ctsn,NA,d_can0_tx,i2c2_sda,spi1_cs0,NA,NA,gpio0_12

pin = P9_21, name = UART2_TXD
mux = 7, pullup = pullup, slew = fast
options = spi0_d0,uart2_txd,i2c2_scl,NA,NA,NA,NA,gpio0_3

pin = P9_22, name = UART2_RXD
mux = 7, pullup = pullup, slew = fast
options = spi0_sclk,uart2_rxd,i2c2_sda,NA,NA,NA,NA,gpio0_2

pin = P9_23, name = GPIO1_17
mux = 7, pullup = pulldown, slew = fast
options = gpmc_a1,gmii2_rxdv,rgmii2_rctl,mmc2_dat0,gpmc_a17,pr1_mii1_txd3,ehrpwm0_synco,gpio1_17

pin = P9_24, name = UART1_TXD
mux = 7, pullup = pullup, slew = fast
options = uart1_txd,mmc2_sdwp,d_can1_rx,i2c1_scl,NA,pr1_uart0_txd_mux1,NA,gpio0_15

pin = P9_26, name = UART1_RXD
mux = 7, pullup = pullup, slew = fast
options = uart1_rxd,mmc1_sdwp,d_can1_tx,i2c1_sda,NA,pr1_uart0_rxd_mux1,NA,gpio0_14

pin = P9_27, name = GPIO3_19
mux = 7, pullup = pulldown, slew = fast
options = mcasp0_fsr,NA,mcasp0_axr3,mcasp1_fsx,NA,pr1_pru0_pru_r30_5,NA,gpio3_19

pin = P9_28, name = SPI1_CS0
mux = 2, pullup = pulldown, slew = fast
options = mcasp0_ahclkr,NA,mcasp0_axr2,spi1_cs0,NA,NA,NA,gpio3_17

pin = P9_29, name = SPI1_D0
mux = 0, pullup = pullup, slew = fast
options = mcasp0_fsx,NA,NA,spi1_d0,mmc1_sdcd,NA,NA,gpio3_15

pin = P9_30, name = SPI1_D1
mux = 7, pullup = pulldown, slew = fast
options = mcasp0_axr0,NA,NA,spi1_d1,mmc2_sdcd,NA,NA,gpio3_16

pin = P9_31, name = SPI1_SCLK
mux = 0, pullup = pulldown, slew = fast
options = mcasp0_aclkx,NA,NA,spi1_sclk,mmc0_sdcd,NA,NA,gpio3_14

If the P9 list seems short, it`s only because of all the reserved pins for HDMI framing. I wanted to keep HDMI and see what pins that would leave for robot making.
become a creator
close window

It's Easy To:

C - What - I - Can - Do

• Sign up - Get ID and Password

• Plan and Create a Project That Someone Might Enjoy and May Even Want to Build

• Link to your creation on your favorite social networking site or blog.

• Become famous! Because your projects get a lot of Hits!

 

No parts list with this project. Scan the 'Junkbox Reviewer' below! Find projects by clicking on their parts. Got something in your junkbox? Here's your spot to find something fun to make or build!

 

Junk Box Reviewer
Itching To Start Building A DIY Do It Yourself Project? Got Some Parts of Your Own in your JunkBox? Find projects by Surfing' the Parts List!
  
  
  
  
  
 
Andrei And Jim
Web Developers
Visit the project:

CwhatIcanDo Website


 
  
  
 
L 298 Compact Motor Driver Kit
Solarbotics
Visit the project:

Build the L298 H-Bridge Motor Control


 
  
 
Account On CwhatIcanDo
CwhatIcanDo.com
Visit the project:

HELP :: How To Create a Project


 
  
  
 
Microrobot Avoider Jr
Microrobot
Visit the project:

Robot Man: With Robot Demos


 
  
  
  
 
Brilliant Blue/Green LED
Surplus
Visit the project:

Converting a Flashlight to LED


 
  
 
PICAXE 8 Pin Motor Driver Board
SparkFun
Visit the project:

Easy Cheap Robot Weekend Project


 
  
 
Tracked Vehicle Chassis Kit
Tamiya
Visit the project:

Build Your Own Track Drive Robot


 
  
  
 
PICAXE 8 Pin Motor Driver Board
SparkFun
Visit the project:

Build Your Own Track Drive Robot


 
  
 
Infrared Proximity Sensor Short Range - Sharp GP2D120XJ00F
Sharp
Visit the project:

Build Your Own Track Drive Robot


 
  
 
PICAXE 8 Pin Motor Driver Board
SparkFun
Visit the project:

Build a Robot In 5 Minutes


 
  
 
Infrared Proximity Sensor Short Range - Sharp GP2D120XJ00F
Sharp
Visit the project:

Build a Robot In 5 Minutes


 
  
 
Gear Motor 2 - 224:1 Offset Shaft
SolarBotics
Visit the project:

Build a Robot In 5 Minutes


 
  
 
4 X AA Cell battery holder plus on/off switch
Powerize
Visit the project:

Build a Robot In 5 Minutes


 
  
 
PICAXE 8 Pin Motor Driver Board
SparkFun
Visit the project:

picAxe 8 bit Motor Controller: Look Inside


 
  
 
Infrared Proximity Sensor Short Range - Sharp GP2D120XJ00F
Sharp
Visit the project:

picAxe 8 bit Motor Controller: Look Inside


 
  
 
4 Section In-Ground Batting Net
battingnets.com
Visit the project:

Home Installation of a 4 Section In-Ground Batting Cage


 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
Transformer 1k:8 ohm
xicon
Visit the project:

Pong)))))


 
  
 
PICAXE 8 Pin Motor Driver Board
SparkFun
Visit the project:

Robots Almost Anyone Can Afford


 
  
  
  
 
Morphibian Land Shark
Kid Galaxy
Visit the project:

Morphibian Land Shark


 
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
Parallax (Futaba) Continuous Rotation Servo
futaba (modified)
Visit the project:

How To Build a Robot in a Box


 
  
 
Parallax (Futaba) Standard Servo
futaba
Visit the project:

How To Build a Robot in a Box


 
  
  
  
 
PICAXE 8 Pin Motor Driver Board
SparkFun
Visit the project:

Weekend Project: Get Started With Robots


 
  
  
 
L298 Compact Motor Driver
Solarbotics
Visit the project:

Build a Respectable Autonomous Robot


 
  
 
Infrared Proximity Sensor Short Range - Sharp GP2D120XJ00F
Sharp
Visit the project:

Weekend Project: Get Started With Robots


 
  
  
 
PICAXE 18 Pin Power Project Board
picAxe
Visit the project:

Build a Robot From A Power Wheelchair


 
  
 
PICAXE 18M2 Microcontroller
picAxe
Visit the project:

Build a Robot From A Power Wheelchair


 
  
  
  
  
  
 
Solderless Breadboard For Uno
Jameco Valupro
Visit the project:

Arduino Development VS PicAxe Development


 
  
 
USB 2/0Video Capture Device
SIIG
Visit the project:

On Line Neighborhood Watch


 
  
  
  
 
Eurocard IC Pattern
Velleman
Visit the project:

On Line Neighborhood Watch


 
  
 
40 kHz Weatherproof Transducer
Audiowell Electronics
Visit the project:

Pong)))))


 
  
 
PICAXE 18M2 Microcontroller
picAxe
Visit the project:

Autonomous Robot PVC "Pickup Truck"


 
  
 
Power Amplifier
ST Micro
Visit the project:

Pong)))))


 
  
  

By Creators
WeRbots: i-Mon App
WeRbots: Pong)))))
By Keywords
Ajax: battle
Android: battle
BEAM Robots: battle
Convert Your Flashlight to LED: Converting a Flashlight to LED
How To Build Cheap Bots: Robots Almost Anyone Can Afford
How To Build Cheap Bots: How To Build a Robot in a Box
How To Website: CwhatIcanDo Website
How To Website: Tour This Website
Infrared Proximity Sensor: Build Your Own Track Drive Robot
Quick Build Robot: Build a Robot In 5 Minutes
robot bending: Morphibian Land Shark
Robot Motor Control: Buggy Bot: Wire Frame Bot Body
Robot Motor Control: Robot Basics
Robots: Robot Basics
Rumble Bot Conversions: Robots Almost Anyone Can Afford
Select or type in a Keyword: Converting a Flashlight to LED
web 2.0 site: CwhatIcanDo Website
Weekend Project Robots: Easy Cheap Robot Weekend Project

Click To Expand / Contract Menus. View by Creator, Category, Keywords or Number of Views.

©Copyright 2008 - , CwhatIcanDo.com, all rights reserved.